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Showing posts from March, 2019

12 Tips on How to Eat Better

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March is National Nutrition Month, and UACCM's Wellness Is Necessary Committee (W.I.N.) is offering tips on how to eat more healthy. If you feel like you or your family are not getting enough nutrition, there are several ways to get your diet under control. These tips are provided by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics . 1). Eat Breakfast Start your morning with a healthy breakfast that includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Try making a breakfast burrito with scrambled eggs, low-fat cheese, salsa and a whole wheat tortilla or a parfait with low-fat plain yogurt, fruit and whole grain cereal. 2). Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables Fruits and veggies add color, flavor and texture plus vitamins, minerals and fiber to your plate. Make 2 cups of fruit and 2 ½ cups of vegetables your daily goal. Experiment with different types, including fresh, frozen and canned. 3). Watch Portion Sizes Get out the measuring cups and see how close your po

High-Tech Auto Service Training

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John Bean V3400 3-D Aligner, UACCM Auto Technology Service Lab The automotive technology service program at the University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton is receiving new equipment thanks to its partnership with Snap-on Tools.   The equipment adds to a collection inside UACCM’s Workforce Training Center, helping students learn the latest automotive technology and join a high-demand job market. UACCM received the equipment from John Bean, a subsidiary of Snap-on Tools, either from purchasing or borrowing as part of a loan program.  UACCM’s most recent acquisition is a John Bean T5745 tire and wheel service machine, the newest instrument of its kind on the market. Along with a John Bean wheel balancing machine that will arrive in the coming weeks, Snap-on will rotate these new machines in UACCM’s automotive service laboratory with new prototypes. Howard West, an auto technology instructor at UACCM, calls this equipment state-of-the-art. “The T5745 allows f

UACCM Hosts A High School Welding Competition

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High School student welds at the Workforce Training Center. The University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton is opening its welding facilities to high school students by hosting competitions, a move designed to encourage students to explore in-demand fields in the state. Students from four high schools competed on Monday, March 4, at UACCM’s Workforce Training Center, in the challenges of blueprint reading, shielded metal arc welding, and gas metal arc welding. The Department of Workforce Development and Community Education used the event as a trial run for future, prospective competitions.  “In lieu of the FFA Practice Competition, we decided to hold a Welding Competition with high school agricultural students,” said Denise Pote, coordinator of Workforce Development and Community Education. “For our first year, we wanted to keep participation at a minimum and to limit registration; so we only invited five schools.”  With UACCM instructors serving among t

Holocaust Posters on Exhibit at E. Allen Gordon Library

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The Holocaut Exhibit on display at the E. Allen Gordan Library. When you visit the E. Allen Gordon Library, you will see a new exhibit on display about the Holocaust.  As the University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton hosted its annual Holocaust Survivor Series featuring Alfred M ├╝nzer, students have an opportunity to explore more about the genocide of six million Jewish men, women, and children. The posters originated from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum based out of Washington, D.C., and covers a broad history.  Poster exhibit on display, E. Allen Gordon Library "Bringing in exhibitions curated by historians and other experts helps us create a space where exploration is continued on the students' terms—where they can engage with something that encourages critical thinking and social awareness," said Kristen Cooke, the library director. "Exhibits such as these allow us to bring world issues and trends to the student's doorst